Jerry Walden

Small show 3
A collection of alluring and beautiful small artwork by gallery artists! Each week of November and December we will highlight a different small work from each of our artists! Stay tuned!

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Summer show composite 2400pxl
Summer group show of gallery artists: James Cullinane, Pauline Galiana, Sharon Lawless, Derek Lerner, Jerry Walden and Pancho Westendarp

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Studio visits 2400pxl
Studio Visits January - June 2019

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Featured Artist

Jerry Walden, March 2019

Study083118
For over 40 years Jerry Walden has explored Formalist compositional problems and color theory.

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Jerry working
In February 2019 we paid a visit to Jerry Walden in his Rock Hill, SC studio to talk about his history, his influences and experiences. We'll explore these and other topics in our three-part Studio Visit interview.

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7 twice install 1
In Seven Twice, Seven Twice, Jerry Walden continues his explorations of Formalist compositional problems and color theory in two new large-scale works. The colors in both artworks in the exhibition are derived from Sir Isaac Newton’s seven-hue color chart he developed from his studies and observations of sunlight through a prism (Optiks, 1704). Newton created the world’s first color wheel, thus beginning the field of color theory.

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Edge over easy install 2
Through hardedge paintings in acrylic on canvas Jerry Walden investigates the nature of the aesthetic experience by combining Formalist compositional elements of color, line, pattern and direction with personal emotions and memories.

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Hundred first red lowres
Jerry Walden paints hard-edged visual abstractions in acrylic on canvas by layering and juxtaposing random and well considered stripes of color to form undulating lines of shifting hue and direction that result in multi-colored Formalist compositions.

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Deconstructing jerry 39
Three years ago, a diagnosis of cancer provided artist Jerry Walden the impetus for reflection. Looking back over his career, he felt much of his work was no longer visually valid. To reenergize both himself and his work, he began blocking out parts of his original paintings, covering some parts, leaving others to show through. In Deconstructing Jerry #40 (pictured at right), for example, the artist took his 1971 painting, Hi-way Drive-in, rotated it and painted over some of the original colors. By combining parts of his work that he finds valid with new layers of paint, he creates reinvigorated patchworks that have a life of their own.

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